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news coverage in the civil rights movement that featured jack quite prominently. first i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this and cosponsoring this and also emory university which houses the papers and the wisdom of a great journalists and we are so pleased that the to the surprise winners and the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was generous and made jack's papers our possession now and there is some rich history and i encourage everyone to go and take a look at them. we are here to celebrate the life, memoir, peepers of jack nelson with some people that knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence and consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson for those that don't know is the story of news reporting and of the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at his career, she was born in alabama just across the state line and moves to biloxi where he starts prattling newspapers. he was a newspaper boy, an honorable way to begin. it's how i got my start. [laughter] he gets his first job at the daily herald, an afternoon newspaper
.s. attorney. we talk about fraud and identify theft and hate crimes and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so
news coverage of the civil-rights movement, featured jack quite prominently. first of all, i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this one and for cosponsoring it and also the emory university libraries, particularly the manuscript archives and rare books librarian which houses and in the papers and the wisdom of a great number of seven journalists. white, african-american, all sorts -- we are so pleased that five of those opulence a prizewinners'. the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was so generous and has made jackson papers our position now. there is a rich, rich history, and ensure it -- encourage everyone to take a look. we are here to celebrate the life and more, the papers of jack nelson with some people who knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence in consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson, for those who don't know, the story of news reporting and the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at this career starting off -- he was born in telling the of just across the state line to moves as a child to bil
-americans as they marched in selma. >> bill: tom brokaw comparing the gun control debate to civil rights. is that right? we'll debate that. >> tell bill i said hey. >> are you going to come on the show one of these days? >> sure. i have been invited? >> you have. >> bill: jesse watters confronting collin powell at the inaugurations even as the general echos another white house opinion. watters world tonight. >> o'reilly, i have been on a couple of his lists. [ laughter ] >> bill: caution, you where to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> bill: hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. bill o'reilly and liberalism. that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. great joy in left wing precincts after president obama's speech yesterday. no longer does the president seek to portray himself as a moderate. he is thought an out-of-the closet liberal. that's no surprise. every american should have realized the president's left wing ideology long before the address. the problem we have in america is not, is not president obama. the problem is us. we, the people. have to d
of the modern state of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans tender civil rights movement. stone wall is the stonewall is really the way this movement kicked off. host: richard, connecticut, independent line. caller: i do not understand why you don't have someone from the opposition to this gentleman on the show, because it is is somewhat controversial subject and you have one view. that is very obvious to anyone watching the show. a second point is that, internationally, people like this gentleman who have support in the united states -- in many countries against the nets is, if you got now, ukraine, russia, hungary, dozens and dozens of nations are looking at the united states as an evil mention because tunnel men like this person -- gentleman like this person, " have lots of money and have more money than average americans, are going into these nations and promoting the homosexual lifestyle. in russia, they had a riot and had to shut down our professed homosexual demonstration in -- shut down a pro-homosexual demonstration because, was funded b -- was funded by american groups. and
's right, shep. you heard the president citing both of them, talking a lot about civil rights and really casting himself as someone who wants to carry on their civil rights legacies. i think the broadered message of that what it means in the current political environment is he made very clear that he just didn't win the last election. he believes he has a mandate. he believes he is going to be very aggressive in the days ahead. he was talking about taking action on climate change, immigration reform and at a time when everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits. he also gave a very rigorous defense of entitlement spending, take a listen. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. [ applause ] they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. [ applause ] >> now, interesting as well that the white house put out a tweet about another part of the speech where he said, quote: our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and
they thought at the time, the people in the civil rights movement fought. was the police making of the intrusions face of the fbi as their friends which relatively speaking the fbi agents on the ground. it's a complex period. you have a hostile political part of the fbi and a relatively friendly, crimefighting part of the fbi coexisting at a time when the movement is under constant danger, the various scattered movement throughout the south. c-span: "parting the waters," your first book was published in what your? >> guest: at the end of 1988. c-span: was the per code that you discussed? >> guest: 54 to 63. the year the brown decision, the year the supreme court unanimously said in effect their racial segregation and subornation is in conflict with the american constitution, kind of reading the challenge of the civil war period about slavery being in conflict with promise of equal citizenship. though that's 54, i'm going to 68 when that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the wat
of the civil right lawyer. tell me about your book. >> guest: my book is a collective pieing agraph of six african-american civil rights lawyers who practiced law during the era of segregation and it's about their struggles with civil rights and racial identity. at it about the fact that to be an african-american civil rights lawyer in this era, argue in the book, is to be caught between the black and who it world. both blacks and whites want things of these lawyers and identify with these lawyers. so, to be this kind of a lawyer, thurgood marshall and people like him, was not just an african-american lawyer but member caught between the black and white world. >> host: how difficult for an african-american to become a lawyer at that time. >> guest: it's not difficult to become a lawyer. you have to good to law school like everybody everybody else, which does cost money, but it's difficult to be a lawyer because no african-american lawyer in this period is going to have white clients or very few of them will have white clients. most black people don't have money and if you have money and yo
conference dr. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the movement for equality not just for the south, but throughout the nation. >> i still have a dream. >> yes. >> it is deeply rooted in the american dream. >> mike: in 1963, dr. king brought the march to washington and announced his dream for all to hear. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of this creed. the children who will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> mike: the power of those words forced washington to take action and a year later, the civil rights act of 1964 became law. making it illegal for federal and state governments to discriminate based on color, sex, or religion. dr. king's mission brought him to selma, alabama in 1965. he attempted to lead a march to the state's capitol, but mob and police violence forced them to stop. that day became known as bloody sunday. >> somewhere i read of the freedom of speech. somewhere i read of the freedom of pr
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
to a second term on a holiday celebrating one of its foremost civil rights leaders. >> while these truths may be self-evident, they have never been self-executing. >> reporter: it was as much an inauguration as a cross cultural celebration. a place where a puerto rican woman raised in a housing project swears in a catholic environment from scranton, pennsylvania, where a gay cuban immigrant reads his home about a rising sun shining equally on all of us. >> my face, your face. millions of faces in morning's mirrors. >> president obama tied it all together in his speech, linking his vision to the evolving history of civil rights in the u.s. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still, just as it guided our forbearers to seneca falls and selma and stonewall. just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsong, who left footprints along this great mall, to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. >> reporter: he swore on the bibles of abraham lincoln and dr. martin luther king jr., connecticuting
, but unlikely support. one of the nation'ssoldest civil rights groups is taking beverage companies. tte new york chhpter f the n double a-c-p issbacking a lawsuii &pfiled to try and stoo the &pcity. hazel duues is the ny chhptee presidenn. hazel: it's not about race.mary:it's about? hazel:economics.mary: aad how? hazel:""ispariiy. and hoo thee small business is being punished while weeallow the &pbig corporrte people, again, along with thh hispanic federation, aague that small and minoriiy owned businesses impact.then there's the nate - obesity epiddmic.non hispanic &pblacks...accorring to the cdc...hhve the highest rates of obesity at 44 percent...followed by mexiian amerrcans at 39 ercent.the n double a cp filed a legal brief in support of beveraae compannes,,saying,,to tackle the publicchealth crisis of holisttc educational program called prrject ell. the project...according to the n douule a cp's website...is thh coca cola oundaaion....tte philanthropic arm oo the company. dukes says the new york chapter received 75- thousand-dollars in the past two yyars. marr: do you hinkk there's a
to their new building. henry marsh grew up to be a civil rights lawyer. he worked for the integration of schools. in 1977, he became the first african-american mayor of richmond, virginia. he has served in the virginia state senate since 1992. only two active senators have served in that chamber longer than he has. senator marsh wanted to see the inauguration of this president on martin luther king day. mr. marsh is 79 years old. it seems unlikely that there will be an inauguration quite like this again any time soon. so for a day, henry marsh left behind the virginia state senate. the virginia state senate i should tell you stands at an even 20-20. it is equally divided, half republicans and half democrats. 20 on one side, 20 on the other. and while senator marsh was away on this within day while he was at the inauguration, the republicans in the senate decided to do this. surprise! we're going to redraw virginia's state senate districts with no warning, while you were out, we're going to do this. ta-da. the associated press says, quote, state senate republicans have muscled a surrep
, making mentions of past civil rights struggles on that martin luther king day, seneca falls, selma, stonewall and laying out his vision for the future, advancing gay rights, tolerance toward illegal immigrants, social welfare programs and stopping climate change. dan loathian was there watching it all with us. dan, friend and foe alike have been calling this a muscular speech. >> reporter: it really was according to those who got a chance to witness the speech. the president delivering his remarks in a much more different climate than he faced four years ago when you had two wars, there was the economic crisis. this time, the president laid out a progressive agenda for the next four years. and so it began, the second inaugural ceremony of president obama, part campaign speech, part lecture, a confident president obama appeared comfortable in his skin. >> my fellow americans, we're made for this moment and we'll seize it as long as we seize it together. we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal >> our journey is not complete unti
for everybody. he also talked about the civil rights movement. i think the idea behind this of s of basic equality and opportunity. our country is founded on those principles. when he talked about immigration today, again, it was opportunity and equality and he's going to fight for that just as he had his entire career he's going to do that for the next four years. his hope-- as we had the national day of service yesterday sds that ordinary americans get involved. get engaged with their country whether through volunteerism, whether through letting their voices be heard as we try to pursue legislation in washington it's a spirit of for engagement and that was a big part of what the president was saying today. we don't have to solve all of our problems but let's not put the short-term political interests ahead of the american people. >> schieffer: ms. jarrett, it's bob schieffer here. i wanted to ask you, because you do know the president so well. republicans i keep hearing say, well, they think the president doesn't like them. they say he doesn't like politics. that he doesn't like to get
in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
and civil rights. in fact civil rights for gays was a centerpiece of the president wants speech today. he said more about it than any president in a presidential address. while is he preoccupied with social justice that's in part because these other issues that you spoke about, invog gore rating the economy which has had such anemic recovery and dealing with the burgeoning deficits and exploding national debt are issues that don't particularly interest him. i'm not sure that the economy ever has. you may recall when he first took office he got through congress this stimulus package which was kind of a grab bag of spending of all kinds favored by members of his party in congress and then he basically abandoned the issue to take on something that i think appealed to him much more, that being the reform of the healthcare system. known as obama care which was adding another entitlement. >> >> bill: let me stop you there you would agree with me that president obama is a i have intelligent man, correct? >> he yes, very much so. he has to know the track is he on is going to cause irreparable har
the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal then surely the love we dmoyt one another must be equal as well. >>reporter: president insisting we address climate change and immigration arguing we should welcome striving immigrants. >> until bright young students and engineers are listed in our work force rather than expelled from our country there. were powerful performances. kelly clarkson stirring rendition of my country 'tis of thee. ♪ [ singing]. >>reporter: beyonce returning 4 years later this time to sing the national anthem. ♪ the rockets♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof ♪ through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ . >>reporter: as the president made his exit up those steps, a pause. turning around to take in his final inaugural moment one more time. microphone picking up what he said. >> about first couple made their way back to the white house, they emerge from the motorcade as they did 4 years ago. crowds cheering return home. first family taking in a parade. first couple with the kiss. the president moving to the
term starts with passing medicare, voting rights act, civil rights act just on the triumph of getting social welfare legislation through and here comes vietnam in 1965 overshadowing it all and everything turns and as you're listening to the tapes of these conversations and you hear the despair in his -- the growing despair in his voice as vietnam comes to overshadow everything he wanted to do and that he wanted to started to do in the second term. you see how a second term can go really bad. >> rose: what did he say "that bitch of a war stole --" >> the woman i love, the great society. >> rose: the challenge for a second term? >> well, the challenge i think often times is that a president who's had great reelections suddenly finds he has less power than he thought he had. franklin park zoo in -- franklin roosevelt in 1937, more democratic congress than in any time of the century suddenly realize that the supreme court can keep on overruling the things he gets passed through congress so he tries to pack the supreme court, slapped down, bad second term. in nixon's case-- and i think bob
several pivotal civil rights moments, he linked them together. dan yoth lothian has the highlights. >> reporter: this is a speech we're told the president had been working on since mid december, and he delivered it rather in a much different climate than he had four years ago, and he was dealing with two wars and also a financial crisis this time, the president used history to help define a progressive agenda for the next four years. >> please raise your right hand. >> reporter: and so it began. the second inaugural ceremony of president barack obama. part campaign speech, part pragmatic lecture, a confident mr. obama appeared comfortable in his presidential skin. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and he will shall seize it together. >> reporter: the speech was rooted in history and fittingly on this holiday, reverend martin luther king jr.'s dream. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident. that all men are created equal. >> the past made modern with first-time references to climate change, immigration reform and sexual equality. >> our journey is not complete u
and vice president paid tribute to dr. king a second time, pausing at a bust of the slain civil rights leader in the rotunda. during the procession down pennsylvania avenue, the president and first lady walked part of the way and later took their place in the reviewing stand as the inaugural parade began. ♪ >> reporter: and the party continued into the night. ♪ he's president and he's on fire ♪ >> reporter: michelle obama wowed the audiences at two inaugural balls in a ruby chiffon and velvet gown by jason wu. but the celebration was not as grand as 2009 which saw the president and first lady attend ten balls. >> now that the parties are over the work on president obama's second term begins. susan mcginnis with more on that. good morning. >> reporter: anne-marie, good morning. yes, item number one is the debt limit. we learned on monday that the house will vote tomorrow on raising the debt ceiling for a period of three months, and the republicans have made a big concession. they had their dance and took a moment to savor the scene. now it's time to get ba
become the largest and most important civil rights protest in the world. [applause] please join me in welcoming the new president of the march for life, jeanne monahan. [applause] >> thank you. is anybody cold out there? [laughter] it is a little chilly, right? is ok. we are here for a pretty important cause, right? [applause]i can't. . hear you. [applause] today marks a somber moment in our country's history. we remember that 55 million americans have died as a result of legalized abortion in the last four decades. 55 million. this makes up about a fix of our current adulation in the united states of america. even the center for disease control and prevention reported that about one in five people are not allowed to live annually in the united states because of abortion. abortion truly is the human rights abuse of today. [applause] and abortion is not good for women. experience, science, and research continue to show what common sense already tells us. abortion takes the life of a baby and wounds its mother and father. it is a somber moment. and yet, i believe that we are seeing s
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
the grounder work and test the stage. then we can be last on civil rights but first on human rights. we believe being -- >> emma anderson chose do become a mother two years ago when she had her daughter. now out of work, she is struggling with her decision not to become a mother again. >> i'm really undecided about how i feel on it. but i know it's something i have to do. i have to do what's best for me at this point. >> "bbc world news", mississippi. >> a lot to think about this. plenty more on our top story, the election in israel. but stay with us here on "bbc world news." >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. decisions. we offer expertise and tailored
on civil rights, but we can be right -- we can be first on human rights. instead of being laughed, we want to be first at something, and we believe being first ending abortion is a good thing. >> 3 hours drive from jackson, you have reached the mississippi delta. in one of the poorest parts of america, choosing to have an abortion is not an option for many women. they cannot afford to pay for the procedure. >> she is 13 years old. last month, she gave birth to her daughter. >> it is hard to go to school. i'm very sleepy. >> [indiscernible] >> gin at ground level has been working with pregnant teenagers in the delta and for 17 years. she is worried that the jackson clinic closes, more of these weylandt will have an unwanted pregnancies. -- more of these women will have unwanted pregnancies. >> [indiscernible] >> hsu became a mother two years ago when she had her daughter. now out of work, she is struggling with her decision not to become a mother again. >> i know this is something i have to do. i have to do this for me. >> bbc news, mississippi. >> the restriction of abortion rights 40 year
don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i t
obama, "the bridge," talks about how he grew out of the civil rights movement, led by martin luther king. you write in the book, david, that race has been at the core of president obama's story. but it's not been in the foreground of his presidency. >> that's true. he's gotten some criticism for that from some bloack leaders. he views his presence in the white house is essential. and everything he can do, whether it's improving the economy or keeping the united states safe, improves the lives of all americans. he's very wary of being the president of black america. he's insistent on being the president of the united states. and sometimes, that's caused him difficulty with certain black leaders. cornell west is one. there's others. >> and you said the president blames his americanism. what did you mean by that? >> president obama is very clear, he has the opportunity to represent all of america. he realizes that that history helps him lead the entire country. and so, he's claimed his america is not simply as black america. >> i was just going to say. this is also the 150th anniversary her
. the president referenced the slain civil rights leader prominently in the remarks. he took on gay rights and immigration and entitlements and the deep political divide across our nation. first to the parade route. john roberts will travel with the parade along pennsylvania avenue if the technical gods allow it. john, good afternoon. >> so far the gods are with us. if we could spin the camera over here a little bit you can see the east front of the capitol the president will join the motorcade coming out of the driveway from the east front to the constitution avenue. this will be in the next hour and a half to two hours. the parade is 1.5 mile long including a mix of civilian and military contributions, mostly marching bands and a lost floats that will be brought in from the civilian side of things something implemented in 1841 by william henry harrison. you will know he liked to do things big. he had the longist inaugural address of anyone at two hours in horrible weather and he did not wear a hat or cold and he died 30 days later but he had floats in the parade. there are 2,100 members
. in a fundamental way, labor has to work with the kinds of folks we talked about here, civil rights, in a much more basic way than they have the last 80 years. it has to be like core, we're in this together. we're going to fight foreclosures as much as we're going to fight for bargaining rights. we're going to fight climate change as much as we're going to fight to raise the standard of living. it's going to take that kind of labor movement, and i think a lot of us are ripe for that kind of labor movement. >> last year, 2012, labor took a series of defeats right on the chin in wisconsin, michigan and other places. i think you wrote recently that 88% of the workers in this country do not have collective bargaining rights, and 12% who do are constantly fighting a defensive battle. how do you change that? is labor dying? >> i think -- well, the way we change that is that part of the agenda, the economic justice part that the democracy part goes with it, but on the economic justice front, part of it is to get the partners, which there are now, the greens, the civil rights, the students, the others, to
. franklin roosevelt was moved by later movements. lyndon johnson had the civil rights movement. i think we begin with that. this book comes out at a moment when the country sees the power and possibility of occupy, 99%, and how that has shifted. it is still evolving. it has shifted the center of political gravity of our dialogue. the issue has been off the radar for so long. >> roosevelt surfed and harnessed those movements. he used them to get legislation passed to initiate programs. obama is still getting on his wet suit. to read the essay she wrote in 2008, there was a sense of exhibits -- exuberance. you say that hope is not optimism that expects things to turn out well. it seems like he confused those two things. >> i will come back to what i write about in the book. the expectations were so great and high. go back to 2008. the back to the election and year when we are fortunate region were fortunate enough to be living with debates that were not cruel reality shows. every week, there were debates among the democratic candidates. barack obama embodied change. it seemed he brought into
. [laughter] >> i was lucky enough to be there for all of them. >> the president spoke about selma, civil rights, seneca falls, stonewalled, where the modern gay rights movement was born. the couple of things happen. congress will have an impact on the administration. harry reid and mitch monnell of reaching an agreement on the filibuster, nothing profound, but that they will raise the debt ceiling to may 18. how will this impact the presidency? >> what the house did is a sign of what is ahead of us. they have not gone over the defeat from november. they have no leverage. they disvered theyave e leverage and now have to wait to back down. this is a face-saving device to kick it down the road until may. the president is in a much stronger position in dealing with the republicans in the house. >> do you agree with that? >> i always respect colby's opinion, but the president, like any reelected president, essentially, absent a national event where he becomes a dramatic figure, watches his popularity be rationed out day- by-day. he is strong now. it is hard to believe that he will be as stron
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 222 (some duplicates have been removed)